Posts

Latest Post

Echo Dot (3rd Gen) Ceiling Mount

Image
  Alexa, play my playlist... My goal has been to have music easily accessible while hanging out on my front patio. I'm aware of all kinds of stereo's, Bluetooth speakers/devices that could accomplish this, but I wanted something that wasn't tied to my smartphone, as well as something that wouldn't involve a major renovation (my front wall is brick). Now before people start to comment that I could have run stereo speakers in the soffit and into my house, that was already more work than I had planned as the soffit doesn't seem to be removable without using destructive force (I'm not sure how it was installed). I also wanted something that would be relatively permanent, in that I didn't want to have to charge something, or turn it on and off.  My solution was an echo dot mounted to the soffit, where my echo dot would be sheltered from the elements and provide music upon verbal command. So I turned to the world wide web for solutions, and there are a few great i

Bye Bye Xterra

Image
Last picture of Me and my 2000 Nissan Xterra On October 8th of 2016, I said goodbye to my beloved Nissan Xterra. My new ride is a 2011 Nissan Versa Sedan. Stay tuned as I'm sure there will be some upcoming projects scheduled in the new year.

2005 Yamaha BWS: Strip Down

Image
Just a little update on the Bug-eye's current state and condition. It's sitting in the garage being slowly disassembled. Most of the rear end has been removed, beginning with the seat, fairings, tail light, turn signals, wheel, and engine.   I ran into issues removing the front fairings which I will document in an upcoming post. Until then I hope these pictures will tie all of you over until then.

ROM: OUYA

Image
Prior to being acquired by RAZOR (July 27, 2015), the OUYA would normally see system updates rolling out every 4 to 6 months. It's been over a year (Nov. 6, 2014) since we've seen a system update to our beloved OUYA set-top box. With no indications from OUYA or RAZOR as to when an update is coming, I've decided to take things into my own hands. My current problem with the OUYA is that its ROM comes with a proprietary operating system based off Android 4.1 (Jellybean). While this was state of the art back in early 2013, Android 4.1 is no longer being supported by KODI developers. To me, KODI a.k.a. XBMC, is what made the OUYA such an awesome device. So I want to update my OUYA so as to continue being able to use KODI.

2005 Yamaha BWS: Introduction

Image
While surfing Craigslist, I came across a post for a 2005 Yamaha BWS YW50 scooter a.k.a. The Bug-Eye (They are called bug-eye because the headlights resemble the eyes of a bug). The seller was asking $600 as-is, since he was certain that he had blown the engine. Even with a blown engine, at $600 this was a rather good deal. I already own a highly tuned 2001 Yamaha BWS CW50 (Pre-Bug) and have always hoped to get my hands on a Bug-Eye. Why do I want a Bug-Eye so bad... Well the 2005 and newer Yamaha BWS scooters have a much beefier front suspension, a slightly wider stance, and far better gearing for in city driving. So I contacted the seller to make an offer only to be told that the scooter was already SOLD. Oh, the highs and lows that come from scavenging through Craigslist. The next day, I get a call from the scooter owner informing me that his previous deal didn't go through, and the scooter was still available if I still wanted it. So I borrowed my brother, and his pickup

Motorola DCT3416 Repair

Image
My brothers Motorola DCT3416 died, and I figured I would attempt to fix it. I want to start out by saying I know very little about PVR's, other than somewhere buried inside is a standard computer hard drive. While dropping off the DCT3416, my brother informs me that it doesn't turn on, and that it makes this clicking noise. My first assumption is that the HD is corrupt and or damaged and preventing the machine from booting. Replacing the internal HD should produce a simple fix, so lets go about doing just that. Replacing the internal HD is going to be slightly more complicated than originally anticipated as the rear of the DCT3416 has 3 tamper proof/security screws, which I do not have a tool for. Instead I used a series of pliers, and 10 minutes later had all the screws removed. Here is what the tamper proof/security screws look like, once removed.   I should add that there is also a plastic security tab, just above the IEEE 1394 jacks, which disintegrated when

My top 3 posts of all time

Motorola DCT3416 Repair

ROM: R-BOX Pro

ROM: OUYA